PLoS ONE - Volume 3, issue 9

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Electronic ISSN
1932-6203

Abstract

The cause of the current increase in obesity in westernized nations is poorly understood but is frequently attributed to a ‘thrifty genotype,’ an evolutionary predisposition to store calories in times of plenty to protect against future scarcity. In modern, industrialized environments that provid

Journal: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 9, 2008

Abstract

We present a simple model of genetic regulatory networks in which regulatory connections among genes are mediated by a limited number of signaling molecules. Each gene in our model produces (publishes) a single gene product, which regulates the expression of other genes by binding to regulatory r

Journal: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 9, 2008

Abstract

Calorie restriction (CR) produces several health benefits and increases lifespan in many species. Studies suggest that alternate-day fasting (ADF) and exercise can also provide these benefits. Whether CR results in lifespan extension in humans is not known and a direct investigation is not feasib

Journal: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 9, 2008

Abstract

Background

According to the WHO, more than 1 billion people worldwide are overweight and at risk of developing chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and stroke. Current therapies show limited efficacy and are often associated with unpleasant side-effect

Journal: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 9, 2008

Abstract

Background

Significant portion of αA-crystallin in human lenses exists as C-terminal residues cleaved at residues 172, 168, and 162. Chaperone activity, determined with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and βL-crystallin as target proteins, was increased in αA1–172 and decreased in αA1–1

Journal: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 9, 2008