Environmental Health Perspectives - Volume 113, issue 11

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Electronic ISSN
1552-9924
Print ISSN
0091-6765

Abstract

Any exposure to radiation may cause cell damage that could lead to cancer, according to a June 2005 report from the National Research Council. The risk noted by the report, though small, is a third higher than the risk of 8.46 cancers per 10,000 people exposed to 1 rem (or 10 millisieverts [mSv])

Journal: Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 113, no. 11, 2005

Abstract

Anyone with common seasonal allergies knows perfectly well what’s causing their misery: pollen! And allergists know why pollen makes people sneeze: the body’s immune system is releasing a lot of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils and eosinophils, in response to the invading pollen proteins

Journal: Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 113, no. 11, 2005

Abstract

Edited by Olle Selinus, Brian Alloway, José A. Centeno, Robert B. Finkleman, Ron Fuge, Ulf Lindh, and Pauline Smedley

Burlington, MA:Elsevier Academic Press, 2005. 812 pp. ISBN: 0-1263-6341-2, $99.95 cloth

Emerging disease, pesticides, antibiotic resistance, heavy metals—every

Journal: Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 113, no. 11, 2005