BMC Genomics - Volume 7, issue Preprint

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Electronic ISSN
1471-2164

Abstract

Background

The strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) recently found in genic or exonic regions of the human genome demonstrated that LD can be increased by evolutionary mechanisms that select for functionally important loci. This suggests that LD might be stronger in regions conserved among species t

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Genes and proteins are organized into functional modular networks in which the network context of a gene or protein has implications for cellular function. Highly connected hub proteins, largely responsible for maintaining network connectivity, have been found to be much more likely to

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an aquatic, halophilic, Gram-negative bacterium, first discovered in 1950 in Japan during a food-poisoning outbreak. Infections resulting from consumption of V. parahaemolyticus have increased globally in the last 10 years leading to the bacteriu

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Aroclor 1254 is a well-known hepatotoxin and consists of a complex mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), some of which have the ability to activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and other transcription factors (TFs). Altered transcription factor expression enables activatio

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

High-throughput genotyping technologies represent a highly efficient way to accelerate genetic mapping and enable association studies. As a first step toward this goal, we aimed to develop a resource of candidate Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) in white spruce (Picea glauca

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Several millions single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have already been collected and deposited in public databases and these are important resources not only for use as markers to identify disease-associated genes, but also to understand the mechanisms that underlie the genome divers

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

There are many potential sources of variability in a microarray experiment. Variation can arise from many aspects of the collection and processing of samples for gene expression analysis. Oligonucleotide-based arrays are thought to minimize one source of variability as identical oligonu

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Proteins containing FERM domains comprise a diverse group of eukaryotic proteins that bind membrane proteins and lipids. In doing so, they organise membrane microstructure, and coordinate the disposition of signalling and cell adhesion complexes. In protein 4.1R, phosphorylation adjacen

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

The Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD) is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing centralized access to publicly available cotton microsatellites, an invaluable resource for basic and applied research in cotton breeding.

Description

At present CMD contai

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006

Abstract

Background

Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gen

Journal: BMC Genomics, vol. 7, no. Preprint, 2006